Heuristic Play, Uncategorized

Treasure Baskets and your baby

I love watching and supporting babies exploring Treasure Baskets.  Seeing the delight in their faces as they explore textures, tastes and smells that are so very different to the plastic that so many toys are made off.   Treasure Baskets have always been a part of my BabyBeans classes since they began in 2007 and as Jellybeans Music enters it’s 13th year of classes, new baskets have been created over the summer just waiting to be explored and loved.

I first discovered Treasure Baskets during my training to be a Montessori Directress back in the 1990s and I fell in love with them immediately.  When I became a mum,  Treasure Baskets became part of our world and my three babies and I spent many, many happy hours sitting contentedly together while they emptied and explored the contents.

So what is a Treasure Basket?  Essentially it is a low, wicker, round basket crammed full of objects full of different textures, tastes and smells, that can be found all over the house and in nature. From pine cones to wooden spoons. Lemon squeezers to doorstops. Silk scarves to leather purses, these baskets are full of wonder and delight as they are emptied, loaded, explored and mouthed.

Why is this sort of play important?  Treasure Baskets allow babies to discover and learn things by exploring every day objects, not toys.   Have a look at the toys in your house.  The majority are probably brightly coloured plastic or wood and while they can stimulate some of the senses they are unlikely to create opportunities for babies to develop critical thinking and problem solving skills.  When a baby is exploring a Treasure Basket, this play is described as Heuristic, quite simply the interaction between everyday objects and a baby/child.  The term Heuristic was coined by Elinor Goldschmeid in the 1980s  and this way of playing encourages eye hand coordination, fine motor skills, muscle control and creativity and imagination.

Interested?  Intrigued? Here’s how to build your own Treasure Basket just for your baby

Find a low flat container – your baby will be exploring this container and will tip it over so ideally something they can lean on safely.  Wicker is perfect due to it’s texture but a cardboard shoebox is also a great way to start

Have a look through your kitchen drawers and around your home. Everything you need is already there!  Wooden spoons, shiny metal ladles.  Wooden egg cups, wooden curtain rings.  Nail brushes, loofahs, shells, keys, pine cones.  The list is endless, use your imagination and don’t forget smells, lemons, limes, oranges.   Your baby will examine, squeeze, shake, mouth, drop, shake, rub items so remember to check for safety and cleanliness.

Pop them into the container, turn the TV or music off and show the box to your baby.  Sit quietly next to them but don’t interfere with their play.  Smile as they show you what they’ve found, name it but don’t take over.  This is their play and you are there to give them confidence and security.   If you watch closely, you’ll see when they’ve had enough and at that point take the basket away for another time.

So what are you waiting for?  Use your imagination and let your baby discover our amazing day to day world

 

 

 

 

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Stop singing Mummy, Daddy be quiet

Hands up everyone who has ever been told to stop singing along by your child?  Yep, it happens to each and everyone of us who have ever spontaneously dared to sing along with whatever your child is listening too.  It might be a film, it might be their beloved Jellybeans Music Wriggly Giggly CD, it might an advert, it doesn’t really matter to your child, you are interrupting them in a way they don’t like and aren’t happy about.  

But, they are not channelling their inner Simon Cowell, they are not trying to hurt your feelings – they aren’t really old enough to recognise that you will be upset or irritated, they are still primarily egocentric.

Remember how you cheered when your child took their first steps and became a walker?  Remember how you supported your child as they worked out how to deal with separation anxiety?  It’s time to support and cheer your way through yet another developmental stage, the emergence of Independence and trying to stop you doing something they don’t want is part of that.

So next time you are happily singing and you are told in no uncertain terms to ‘shush’, try not to feel too upset or offended – easier said than done I know, I wasn’t allowed to sing at home for years when my 3 boys were growing up.  As one decided it was ok, singing with mum was acceptable, the next one would hit this stage and it would be back to silence on my part again.

Instead why not try these strategies

  • When you are told to stop singing, ask them to join in with you.
  • Give them a choice to direct how you are going to sing together eg do you want to sing the first bit and I’ll sing the second?
  • Let them feel involved in the decision making – “Shall we sing fast or slow?”
  • If they really won’t let you sing, agree to stop for that track but make it clear you really love the next song and will be singing the next song

There appears to be no research indicating that if your child restricts access to music it means they are either not musical or indeed a musical genius.  It is all about independence and gaining control over their environment.   I wish you luck and remember like all early childhood stages, it will pass.  You won’t be banned from singing forever by your small child.  Before you know it, they’ll be a teenager and you will be banned all over again because you are tragically too old and uncool to sing along or the music will be so awful you really won’t want too!

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How your child learns

‘Is there any point to coming to a music class?’

Does this sound familiar?

Is there any point coming as my child just won’t sit still?

or

Is there any point continuing as my child doesn’t join in, just stares at you?

Yep, I get asked this so often and my answer never, ever changes, it will always be a big, loud YES because how your child responds to class depends on how they learn.  Broadly speaking there are three main learning styles visual, kinesthetic or auditory but do you know which learning style your child mainly adopts?  And what about yourself?

Let’s start with the big balls of energy, the Kinesthetic learners.  They are the ones who are whirling, bouncing, toddling around the room, exploring the corners, the plug sockets.  They love being lifted, dipped, spun, swirled but may will resist loudly being brought back to a lap.  These jellybeans are not being disruptive or rowdy.   They are not ignoring what is going on.  They simply learn best when they use their entire bodies so as long as they are safe, let them experience the music physically and try to resist the urge to get them to ‘sit down and pay attention’.

Hands up who has a child who sits and watches everything very intently?  A child who will stare at either your mouth or mine while we are singing?  This child is not choosing not to ‘participate’ or is ‘unsocial’.  This child learns best when they visually focus intently on what is going on in the class.   To help them really maximise their learning, these are the children who appreciate big exaggerated facial actions when you sing and will watch your body move to the beat, so stamp, clap, tap purposefully.  Please try not to interrupt them when they are focused by trying to get them to drum with you or sing with you.  I have no doubt that the minute they leave the room all through the week, they sing, they move, they re-enact what they have experienced at home.

And last but by no means least, the auditory learners.   This child will be singing both in class and at home, although they may well be telling you not to sing along with a CD so they don’t have to cope with two different auditory sources.  These are the children who may avoid direct eye contact preferring to gaze away or be unfocused but they are not necessarily shy, they simply learn most effectively by focusing on what they can hear.    I know it is hard but as long as they are safe, let them be and try not to interrupt their focus.   These are the children who will be loving pauses in music play eg shake and stop and at home they will love simply clapping and tapping out a beat with you and ear whispering games.

But as with everything, we are more than just one thing; we are not mono sensory so please don’t focus too much on just supporting your child’s primary learning style.  In the same way that your child needs a balanced nutritional diet, they need a balanced sensory diet and that is easy, peasy – all our classes are naturally full of multi sensory learning opportunities giving you both kinesthetic, auditory and visual stimulation and support, so you both get a full brain/body experience with music every single class.

 

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When Jellybeans Music met Harry & Meghan

The week has finally arrived when the nation will assemble on their settees by 9am on Saturday 19th May, probably still bleary eyed and in our pyjamas to celebrate the wedding of Prince Harry and Meghan Markle and I am very much looking forward to it – it’s been a long winter, they are in love and it will be beautiful to watch.  But, and this is the but, and it’s a big one,  how do you translate a Royal Wedding into the world of the Jellybeans Music early years music classes and is it even appropriate to do so?

When William married Katherine in 2011, we celebrated the marriage in classes and shops and towns throughout the land were full of red, white and blue wonderfulness.  Even very small children were aware of flags fluttering everywhere.  They were desperate to hold and learn how to wave flags and the majority wore red, white and blue clothes a lot!  Shops were festooned with the memorabilia of the happy couple and the nation was on tenterhooks of excitement.   This time around, although we all wish them a lifetime of happiness, and I really do (especially after having been smiled at by Prince Harry in Grantham A&E once) it would seem the nation is far more relaxed about the event – the shops are not full of their faces, the flags are not flying down the streets and I haven’t heard of a single street party, which begs the question, if I decide to ‘theme’ a week of classes around a wedding, what if anything will that mean to the children and surely the whole point of the classes is to support their developmental needs?

So, here’s the deal.  It’s a huge ‘yes’ from me to the Union Jack, red, white & blue parachute for listening time where we’ll be listening to the traditional nursery rhyme ‘Pussy Cat, Pussy Cat, where have you been’.   It’s an even bigger ‘yes’ from me to flag waving – thinking fast/slow tempos, gross motor skills, impulse control skills and we can extend the use into peek a boo time.  It’s even a possible ‘yes’ from me to heart shaped balloons on the lycra as the week goes on and wedding fever builds but this is a wedding where singing about the 5 corgis on the bed, or the wheels on the royal carriage going round and round, just doesn’t feel right if I’m creating a class thinking like a toddler.

What do you think?  Are you sad we won’t be singing about the corgis and twirling princesses?

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Bubbles, Bubbles

It is no secret at Jellybeans Music that I love bubbles probably as much as babies and toddlers.  I love watching the tiny babies focus on the bubbles swirling above their heads.  I never tire of toddlers trying to catch and blow them and hearing early talkers say the word ‘ubble, ubble’ as soon as they see me, still gives me goosebumps.  But did you know that I use bubbles not just because I love them but because they are a fanastic early years development tool?

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As soon as the bubbles come out, I always start talking about how blowing bubbles can help to build mouth & jaw muscle tone and support breath control, all essential for speech development but did you know that bubbles also support mathematical developmental? It’s not rocket science but if you encourage your child to count the bubbles with you, you are helping them learn to apply the number labels to actuals.  Discuss what shape the bubbles are – again, words like circle, round are introduced in a ‘real’ way!

Watching the bubbles float and fly around the room is a real workout for your child’s eyes.  Very small babies will be learning to use both eyes simultaneously to focus upon the bubbles, whilst slightly older babies, toddlers and pre-schoolers will be reaching up strengthening motor skills and eye-hand co-ordination as they reach for and try to pop the bubbles.  One of my boys really didn’t enjoy messy play – not for him playing with spaghetti and baked beans but he really enjoy the ‘feel’ of bubbles and I think bubbles encouraged him to try new tactile sensations.

Finally, don’t forget it can be very relaxing just watching bubbles floating slowly down to the ground, so even the quietest child can enjoy a cuddle watching them.

But, bubbles are not just for Jellybeans – don’t forget to enjoy them at home together.  Why not try blowing bubbles over your baby/child while they are in the bath?  The bubbles will float and land both on the water (bubbles pop on dry surfaces!) and your child, giving a fun, visual, sensory experience.  Or, if you have a play tunnel, why not blow bubbles through the tunnel?  This will encourage your child to crawl through the tunnel and help to develop their sense of spatial awareness.

Take your bubbles outside and watch how high they fly!  Add a couple of drops of food colouring for extra pretty bubbles and try catching these coloured bubbles on paper!  I could go on and on, but perhaps the best tip of all, is to always have a small pot of bubbles in your handbag for those days when your small one is just restless and you have lots and lots to do.

Bubbles, bubbles fly around.

Bubbles, bubbles touch the ground.

Bubbles landing on my nose.

Bubbles landing on my toes.

Bubbles, bubbles fly around, bubbles, bubbles touch the ground

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The Journey Begins

Hello and thank you so much for joining me.

I know, because you are reading this blog,  that you are already very interested in the developmental benefits of early years music making and in particular how you can make music an even more integral part of your little one’s life.   Indeed, we might even already be sharing a melody or two every week in either a baby beans or a jellybeans class.

Introducing all genres of music to very young children is something that I feel very passionately about so I am really looking forward to sharing my expertise and experiences both within Jellybeans Music classes and in raising my own 3 children, with you.

Thanks for joining me and don’t forget to sign up so you never miss a blog!

Creativity is intelligence having fun — Albert Einstein